The Dalai Lama

In 1938 a two year old boy was recognised through a traditional process of discovery as being the reincarnation of all previous Dalai Lamas, the spiritual rulers of Tibet.

Have almost finished the Dalai Lamas autobiography ‘Freedom in Exile.’ It was a fantastic read, especially for someone who loves autobiographies, Buddhism and virtuous figures with whom to aspire. The above quote emphasises his message which runs like a thread throughout the book. With this in mind, I though it would be a nice idea to share a few stories from his life, and a few concepts which come from Buddhism. Here is an overview. 

In 1938 a two year old boy was recognised through a traditional process of discovery as being the reincarnation of all previous Dalai Lamas, the spiritual rulers of Tibet (more about this in a coming blog). Taken away from his parents, he was brought up in Lhasa according to a monastic regimen of rigorous austerity. Which, from the Dalai Lamas own words, he did not like one bit! Aged seven he was enthroned in the 1000 room Potala palace as the supreme leader of a nation the size of Western Europe, with a population of six million people. At the age of fifteen he became head of state. 

With Tibet under threat from the communist Chinese, there followed a traumatic time in trying to hold on onto the freedom of his people whilst having to maintain his Buddhist precepts of peace and non-violence, therefore avoiding any sort of war or conflict.  

Then, in 1959, he was forced into exile- followed by over 100,000 destitute refugees. Since that time, in exile in the Himalayan village of Dharamsala, he has devoted himself to the plight of his people and to promoting world peace through an unwavering policy of non-violence.

He continues to live his life pursuing the Bodhisattva ideal. According to Buddhist thought, a Bodhisattva is someone on the path to Buddhahood who dedicates themselves entirely to helping other sentient beings towards release from suffering. 

Release from Suffering. Isn’t that what we are all trying to achieve? Whether to you that means; finding your next meal, getting away from a poisonous relationship, or removing certain circumstance in life which promote stress and anxiety. I believe there are many ways at doing this, following the Dharma being one of them. The Dalai Lama inspires one to not only remove as much suffering you can from your current life situation, but also to do the same for your loved ones, and by extension all sentient beings. Because if we concentrate on our similarities instead of our differences, we will notice that we are all human beings, consisting of flesh and bone, and that we are all experiencing suffering to some degree. This should bring us closer together, rather than encouraging division. 

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